Democratic Republic of Congo

Resources for keeping up on events in the Democratic Republic of Congo:

After a recent, tenuous cease-fire was broken, fighting between the Congolese army and a rebel minority has resumed with intensity. The violence has garnered a fair amount of attention from the mainstream media, but how long will that coverage last?

Probably not long considering that foreign affairs, especially those not directly related to the United States, make up only a fraction of what Americans read, see, and hear: 8 percent of network news, 13 percent of newspaper coverage, 4 percent of cable news. The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting pleads with its readers to stay interested in the issue, as continued attention will encourage editors to offer more extensive coverage.

But if and when the conflict fades from America’s consciousness, here are some sites from around the world with thoughtful reports on the situation and its implications:

Have a look at Utne Reader

I’ve watched the issue of the terrible violence in the DRC fall on and off the map for quite awhile and I find it just heartbreaking.  There is a holocaust going on there.  One day, a future generation will ask us what we did about it, just as we interrogate an earlier generation about what they did (didn’t do) about the Jewish holocaust.  I want to have an answer I’m not ashamd of.

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4 thoughts on “Democratic Republic of Congo

  1. For what it’s worth, I entirely agree.

    A couple of weeks ago, the news headlines in the UK were completely dominated, for several days on end, by ‘outrage’ over two very minor celebrities who behaved badly on a fairly obscure radio programme. Many thousands of people contacted the BBC, questions were raised in Parliament (literally!) and everyone had an opinion.

    Meanwhile, in the small print or at the end of the television bulletin, passing reference was made to the fact that tens of thousands of our fellow human beings were being driven from their homes – with all the physical and emotional violence that implies – in the DRC. Few people here seemed very bothered. And yes, I doubt that, insofar as ‘history’ ever ‘judges’ anything, that history will judge us very kindly for that omission.

  2. Yes, the “judgment” of history isn’t exactly a palpable threat, is it? I did read about your “minor celebrities” and for what it’s worth, I entirely agree that it wasn’t worth the attention.

    Thank you so much for your comment.

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